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2014

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2013 Individual Income Tax Organizer and Engagement Letter For New Clients

2013 Income Tax CPA Organizer & Accounting Engagement Letter<

This generic Organizer is intended for New Individual Clients Only. If you are an existing client, and have misplaced your packet, please contact us and we will provide you with your specialized copy.

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2013 Year-End Tax Planning for Businesses

In recent years, end of year tax planning for businesses has been further complicated by uncertainty over the future availability of many tax incentives. The 2013 year-end is no different. In the early hours of January 1, 2013, the Senate passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which permanently extended the so-called Bush-era tax cuts. However, other popular provisions were only extended through 2013. Therefore, 2013 tax strategies include concerns over expiring provisions. But 2013 is also unique due to changes that are affecting businesses.

For example, as part of its primary purpose to facilitate health care reform, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPAC<) includes key tax provisions that affect businesses. Some requirements are already in effect, while other provisions apply starting in 2013 or later. Higher tax rates may be imposed on distributions to owners and the net investment income regulations have the potential to impact individuals who are owners of pass-through entities. In addition, the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in mid-July on the unconstitutionality of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) means changes to retirement plans and employee benefits for same-sex marriages. Also, compliance with final repair regulations affects virtually all businesses.

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2013 Year-End Tax Planning for Individuals

Early in 2013, the 2012 Taxpayer Relief Act was enacted and the “Bush-era” tax cuts, which were scheduled to sunset at the end of 2012, were permanently extended and modified. This legislation is significant because without its enactment, individual tax rates on all income groups would have increased, taxpayer-friendly treatment of capital gains and dividends would have disappeared, and many other popular but temporary incentives would no longer be available.

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2014 Year-End Tax Planning for Businesses

In recent years, end of year tax planning for businesses has been complicated by uncertainty over the availability of many tax incentives. The 2014 year-end is no different. In the early hours of January 1, 2013, the Senate passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which permanently extended the so-called Bush-era tax cuts. However, other popular provisions were only extended through 2013. Therefore, 2014 tax strategies include concerns over the fate of the expired provisions. President Obama, the chairs of the House and Senate tax writing committees, and individual lawmakers all made tax reform proposals in 2014. The proposals ranged from comprehensive tax reform to more piece-meal approaches. However, any progress on legislation is stalled until after the elections and possibly into the beginning of 2015.

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Health Insurance Premium Assistance Credit

Beginning in 2014, a penalty will be imposed on certain individuals who fail to have minimum essential health insurance for themselves and their dependents. However, to help subsidize the cost of health insurance and make it more affordable, eligible individuals who purchase coverage under a qualified health plan through an Affordable Insurance Exchange may receive a premium assistance credit. The IRS has issued guidance for employees on their eligibility to claim this credit.

In order to be eligible for the premium assistance credit, a taxpayer must satisfy the following criteria:

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Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act: Proposed Rules For Employers

The IRS has issued proposed regulations to implement the information reporting requirements for insurers and certain employers under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPAC<). The proposals are a response to an ongoing dialog with representatives of employers, insurers, other reporting entities and individual taxpayers.

Provisions under PPAC< require reporting by insurers, self-insuring employers, and other parties that provide health coverage; and also require information reporting by employers that are large enough to be subject to the employer shared responsibility provisions. In early July 2013, the Obama Administration announced a postponement of PPAC’s mandatory employer and insurer reporting requirements for one year. As a result, the reporting requirements have been delayed until 2015.

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