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Obamacare

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2013 Year-End Tax Planning for Businesses

In recent years, end of year tax planning for businesses has been further complicated by uncertainty over the future availability of many tax incentives. The 2013 year-end is no different. In the early hours of January 1, 2013, the Senate passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which permanently extended the so-called Bush-era tax cuts. However, other popular provisions were only extended through 2013. Therefore, 2013 tax strategies include concerns over expiring provisions. But 2013 is also unique due to changes that are affecting businesses.

For example, as part of its primary purpose to facilitate health care reform, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPAC) includes key tax provisions that affect businesses. Some requirements are already in effect, while other provisions apply starting in 2013 or later. Higher tax rates may be imposed on distributions to owners and the net investment income regulations have the potential to impact individuals who are owners of pass-through entities. In addition, the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in mid-July on the unconstitutionality of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) means changes to retirement plans and employee benefits for same-sex marriages. Also, compliance with final repair regulations affects virtually all businesses.

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2014 Year-End Tax Planning for Businesses

In recent years, end of year tax planning for businesses has been complicated by uncertainty over the availability of many tax incentives. The 2014 year-end is no different. In the early hours of January 1, 2013, the Senate passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which permanently extended the so-called Bush-era tax cuts. However, other popular provisions were only extended through 2013. Therefore, 2014 tax strategies include concerns over the fate of the expired provisions. President Obama, the chairs of the House and Senate tax writing committees, and individual lawmakers all made tax reform proposals in 2014. The proposals ranged from comprehensive tax reform to more piece-meal approaches. However, any progress on legislation is stalled until after the elections and possibly into the beginning of 2015.

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FAQ: Individual Mandate

Under the Affordable Care Act, the federal government, state governments, insurers, employers and individuals are given shared responsibility to reform and improve the availability, quality and affordability of health insurance coverage in the United States. The individual shared responsibility provision, also referred to as the individual mandate, calls for each individual to have minimum essential health coverage (known as minimum essential coverage), qualify for an exemption, or make a payment when filing his or her federal income tax return.

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Final Regulations Issued on Implementation of Additional Medicare Tax

The IRS has issued final regulations on the operation of the 0.9 percent additional Medicare tax, which became effective on January 1, 2013. Generally, the final are effective on or after November 29, 2013. However, taxpayers may rely on rules contained in the proposed regulations for adjusted returns filed before that date.

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Is There a New 3.8% Sales Tax on Real Estate?

We were asked:

I am trying to find out if it is true that homeowners selling after Jan 1 2013 will have to pay a 3.8% sales tax on their sale. I have asked a couple of realtors but on one can give me an answer. I get emails all the time claiming that this is a part of Obamacare in order to pay for it.

We get this question all the time. There was an extremely popular email that claimed such, and the idea gained new life as 2013 rolled around.

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Obamacare Individual Subsidies or Premium Assistance Tax Credit

Will Obamacare Subsidise Your Health Care?

The premium tax credit is a refundable tax credit that helps eligible people with moderate incomes afford health insurance purchased through the Health Insurance Marketplace.

You can choose to have all or part of the credit paid in advance to your insurance company to lower what you pay for your monthly premiums, or you can claim the credit when you file your tax return. If you choose to have the credit paid in advance, you must reconcile the advance payments with the actual credit you compute when you file your tax return.

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Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act: Proposed Rules For Employers

The IRS has issued proposed regulations to implement the information reporting requirements for insurers and certain employers under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPAC). The proposals are a response to an ongoing dialog with representatives of employers, insurers, other reporting entities and individual taxpayers.

Provisions under PPAC require reporting by insurers, self-insuring employers, and other parties that provide health coverage; and also require information reporting by employers that are large enough to be subject to the employer shared responsibility provisions. In early July 2013, the Obama Administration announced a postponement of PPAC’s mandatory employer and insurer reporting requirements for one year. As a result, the reporting requirements have been delayed until 2015.

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