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2012 Taxpayer Relief Act Changes to Alternative Minimum Tax

As you know, the alternative minimum tax (AMT) traps more middle income taxpayers every year. To partially alleviate this tax burden, Congress has been enacting annual “patches” to the AMT to increase exemption amounts. The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (2012 Taxpayer Relief Act) provides immediate relief for the AMT by permanently increasing the AMT exemption amounts retroactive to the 2012 tax year. Beginning in 2013, these base AMT exemption amounts will be adjusted annually for inflation.

For 2012, the exemption amounts are increased to $78,750 for married couples filing jointly and surviving spouses, $50,600 for single taxpayers and heads of households, and $39,375 for married individuals filing separately.

2012 Taxpayer Relief Act Changes to Bonus Depreciation and Code Sec. 179 Expense

Congress has enacted the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (2012 Taxpayer Relief Act), which provides significantly increased incentives for business investment in capital and equipment.

The 2012 Taxpayer Relief Act extends the 50-percent first-year bonus depreciation allowance for one year to apply to qualifying property placed in service through 2013 (through 2014 for certain longer-lived and transportation property). The bonus depreciation allowance rate of 50 percent remains unchanged.

Under the extension provisions, a corporation also is permitted to increase the minimum tax credit limitation by the bonus depreciation amount with respect to certain property placed in service after December 31, 2007 and before January 1, 2014 (January 1, 2015 in the case of longer-lived and transportation property).

2012 Taxpayer Relief Act For Business & Investments

After weeks of negotiation, Congress has passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act to avert the tax side of the “Fiscal Cliff” and bring some certainty to the Tax Code. Almost all taxpayers are affected by the numerous extensions and modifications. Many popular but temporary tax extenders relating to businesses are included in the American Taxpayer Relief Act. Among them is Code Sec. 179 small business expensing, bonus depreciation, the research tax credit, and the Work Opportunity Tax Credit. This letter provides some highlights of the American Taxpayer Relief Act as it applies to investments and business taxpayers.

2012 Taxpayer Relief Act For Individuals

Fiscal Cliff Averted, Tax Payer Relief Act

After much debate and anticipation, Congress has passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 which averts the tax side of the fiscal cliff, provides numerous extenders and avoids the automatic sunset provisions that were scheduled to take effect after 2012 under the “Bush-era” tax cuts in the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRRA<) and the Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003 (JGTRRA<).

2012 Year-End Tax Planning for Businesses

As 2012 comes to a close, get ready for more sweeping tax changes that will affect your business. In 2010, Congress extended many business incentives for one or two years. These incentives are about to expire. In addition, many of the “Bush-era” tax cuts are scheduled to sunset at the end of 2012. It is unclear if Congress will provide further extensions as they debate across-the-board spending cuts scheduled to take effect in 2013. In addition, businesses must prepare to comply with new healthcare reform, and new exacting repair regulations. This combination of events provides tax planning considerations unique to 2012 that requires a multi-year strategy taking into account a variety of scenarios and outcomes.

2013 Year-End Tax Planning for Businesses

In recent years, end of year tax planning for businesses has been further complicated by uncertainty over the future availability of many tax incentives. The 2013 year-end is no different. In the early hours of January 1, 2013, the Senate passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which permanently extended the so-called Bush-era tax cuts. However, other popular provisions were only extended through 2013. Therefore, 2013 tax strategies include concerns over expiring provisions. But 2013 is also unique due to changes that are affecting businesses.

For example, as part of its primary purpose to facilitate health care reform, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPAC<) includes key tax provisions that affect businesses. Some requirements are already in effect, while other provisions apply starting in 2013 or later. Higher tax rates may be imposed on distributions to owners and the net investment income regulations have the potential to impact individuals who are owners of pass-through entities. In addition, the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in mid-July on the unconstitutionality of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) means changes to retirement plans and employee benefits for same-sex marriages. Also, compliance with final repair regulations affects virtually all businesses.

2019 Year-End Tax Planning for Businesses

As year-end approaches, each business should consider the many opportunities that might be lost if year-end tax planning is not explored. A business may want to consider several general strategies, such as use of traditional timing techniques for delaying income recognition and accelerating deductions. A business should also consider customized strategies tailored to its particular situation.

2019 Year-End Tax Planning for Individuals

As the end of 2019 approaches, more and more information and guidance is released by the IRS relating to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, as well as guidance relating to a number of different areas not impacted by the landmark tax reform act. While one of the claimed benefits of tax reform was the simplification of filing and the lowering of income tax rates, there are still many steps that individuals can take that can lower their tax bills. Planning during the final weeks and months of this year involves much more–both in terms of traditional year-end strategies and strategies developed in response to developments that have taken place over the last couple of years. Here are some points to consider:

2020 Extension Request

For existing clients who wish to request an extension, please fill out the following document: